Setting Boundaries Creates Better Behavior

Training Your Dog to Say “Please!”

Dogs that are in a home with boundaries, under a training plan and following this program are set up for success.  Owners experience less challenging behaviors, like counter surfing a door bolting and dogs settle in faster because they know and understand what is expected of them.

 

Learn to Earn

  • Begin by teaching your dog “Sit!”
    • Once your dog knows sit, ask them to sit before they get anything that rewards them.
  • Use everything your dog wants as rewards for training purposes.  Have them sit before any of the following things are given to them.
    • Food, treats, play time, door being opened, leash being put on, meeting new friends, toys and  love from you!
  • Your dog will learn to earn everything they want by politely and automatically saying “Please!” by sitting. This teaches good manners.
    • If you want your leash on, you sit.
    • If you want a door to open, you sit.
    • If you want to be pet, you sit.
  • For the fastest training, dogs should earn their meal throughout the day when you are home.  Reward appropriate behaviors throughout the day.  Click here to learn about the Benefits of Hand Feeding
    • Carry food around with you in your pockets, a bait bag, or have it available in easily accessible containers throughout the house.
    • Hand feeding part or all of their meal is a great way to get the dog learning to listen to all members of the household.  This is a great job for the children in the home.

 

Umbilical Cord Training

  • Keep your dog attached to you in the house, using a leash for the first two weeks.  This prevents your dog from sneaking off and practicing bad habits.  Use a kennel when you can’t watch your dog.

 

Nothing in Life is Free

  • This training technique is very similar to the learn to earn. The difference is that we will extend the idea to many commands.
    • After you dog has learned a few basic commands, these become behaviors that earn anything important.
  • This becomes a gentle reminder to your dog that we do things on your terms.
    • We may be playing and having fun, but each time you will offer an appropriate behavior to continue that play.
  • Define the rules for your dog and be consistent! Make sure the whole family is on the same page or your dog might become confused.
    • For example, does your dog sit before walking through every door way?
    • Does “down” mean lay down or don’t jump?  If your family isn’t on the same page your dog will surely be confused.
  • To busy to hand feed?  Use a Kong Wobbler instead of a food bowl.  This can be picked up from any pet supply store and it should be noted this is different than a regular rubber kong.

Additional Tips and Tricks

Spend time teaching and training your dog to dog basic skills like “Watch” (eye contact on cue), “leave it” and stay during this time.  Click here to learn how to teach leave it

Here is how we teach watch: https://youtu.be/Z4bUBHzPDkM

  • Give your dog a week before introducing your dog to dogs outside of the home.  Before going to the dog park do playdates with your friend’s dogs.
  • Don’t force a scared dog into a kennel, instead use food or toys to convince them it’s fun and safe.
  • Before Behavior Modification Starts: Prepping your dog to learn

 

 

 

Adopted Dog Guide to the First Week

Tips for Preventing Problem Behaviors:

In the first days your dog is home she should be supervised at all
times. If you are not able to supervise, use a crate, training pen, or dog
safe room to confine your dog until you can. When she is not within
sight of you, she needs to be in the type of situation where she cannot
practice unwanted behaviors. Barking, pacing, and other behaviors
that reinforce poor impulse control can be self rewarding to your new
dog. Instead, you want to reinforce good behaviors as they occur
when your dog is near to set your new dog up for success. Otherwise,
you tend to forget and miss training opportunities, which makes
training take weeks or months longer.

When You Bring Your New Dog Home:

1. Family Meeting- On the way home, or on your first night together, agree to what rules
you will have for your new dog. Rules such as sittingfb_img_15564931454843196474217352259138.jpg
before doorways, not jumping up, and what cues you
will use in training. For example, will “Down” mean lay
down, get off the furniture, or no jumping? It can only
mean one thing to your new dog. The more consistent
your family is, the easier life will be for you new pup.
2. Kennel- Kennel training gives your dog a safe place
to hide and helps house training come much more
quickly. It also prevents your dog from being able to
chew when you are not home.
3. Enrichment Feeders- Instead of standard food bowls, allow your dog to chase and play
for their daily kibble. Have lots of FROZEN stuffed rubber Kongs (feel free to mix up
what they are stuffed with to keep it exciting) ready and in the freezer for bored dogs.
4. Leash- When you get home, use a leash inside the house to keep your dog close, so he
can’t sneak off to practice bad behaviors like chewing or peeing indoors.
5. Routine– A routine is very reassuring and calming to your new dog. Try to pick a routine
and stick with it from day one. This should include potty breaks, playtime, walks, rest,
and feeding times.
6. Training– Group classes provide a level of distraction that DIY training normally doesn’t.
Group classes provide an excellent source of socialization that can not be achieved by
the unpredictability of a dog park setting.
7. Decompression- Use your best judgment, and based on the temperament of your new
dog, allow your new family member to relax after their big transition into home life during
your first few weeks together. Try to avoid having large gatherings or taking your dog to
heavily trafficked events until they’ve had time to adjust to their new life.

Learn to Earn

In this Learn to Earn program, the idea is to use everything your20181208_1356265372948299044802583.jpg
dog wants as rewards for training. Your dog will learn to earn
everything they want by politely and automatically saying
“Please” by sitting. If you want want your leash on, you sit. If
you want a door to open, you sit. If you want to be pet, you sit.
Sitting to say “please” teaches good manners.
For the fastest training, dogs should earn their meal throughout
the day when you are home. That means no food in the food
bowl. Instead, you’ll carry food around with you in your pockets,
in a bait bag, or have it available in easily accessible containers
throughout the house. This way, when you are home, you can
reward appropriate behaviors throughout the day.

The idea is to use everything your dogs wants to your advantage for training purposes. The dog
will learn to earn everything they enjoy through polite, appropriate behaviors. At the same time,
the dog will learn that performing undesirable behaviors such as jumping on you causes those
rewards to go away.

If you have a behavior problem, contact us right away!
We can help you address these and teach your dog
to be the dog you’ve always dreamed of.

Questionnaire for behavior

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Email behavior assessment

 

Medical:

How old is your dog:

Does your dog have any medical issues:

When was the last time you took your dog to the vet:

What does your dog eat:

How do you feed your dog:

Any thing else worth noting:

 

History:

Breed:

Where did you get the dog be specific which rescue or breeder:

Do you know if littermates or parents had similar issues:

Did you contact the place you got your dog from and what did they say:

How long ago did you get your dog:

What do you know about your dog’s history (type of socialization, foster, breeder ect):

 

Additional Questions:

What is your dog’s daily routine look like?

What causes your dog to react make a list of everything you can think of?

Has your dog ever bitten a person or dog before?

Does your dog growl if you take him off of furniture?

What cues does your dog know?

Is your dog kennel trained?

 

 

Goals:

What do you want to work on with your dog:

List at least three goals:

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

 

If your dog has any of the following issues please fill out additional questions: ANXIETY, DOG-DOG ISSUES, DOG-HUMAN ISSUES

 

Anxiety:

When did you first notice the problem:

Does your dog poop/pee when alone:

Does your dog cause self harm when alone:

Does your dog seem unable to relax:

Does your dog cause destruction?  If so where in the house be specific

Does your dog whine and pace?

 

Dog-dog aggression or reactivity:

When did you first notice the problem?

What does your dog do when he sees a dog on-leash?

What does your dog do when he meets a dog off-leash?

Has your dog ever bitten another dog?

If so….. How bad was each incident? (How many puncture wounds, did the dog have to be pulled off, was professional care required to treat)

How many times has your dog bitten another dog?

Any additional known dog- dog history known?

 

Dog-Human:

When did you first notice the problem?

What does your dog do when he sees a person when he is on-leash?

What does your dog do when he meets a person and is off-leash?

Has your dog ever bitten a person?

If so….. How bad was each incident? (How many puncture wounds, did the dog have to be pulled off, was professional care required to treat)

How many times has your dog bitten a person (clothing, or skin)?

How many of those broke skin?

Is your dog muzzle trained?