Tricks Event

Englewood Tricks Title EventAt Bennett Canine Training we love encouraging our students to take their training to the next step and strongly believe EVERY dog can and should be able to pass a Canine Good Citizen Test. 

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What is the Canine Good Citizen Test?  It is a ten point test open to ALL breeds and mixes.  The test is looking for basic manners and stability in public.  Our students reach this goal feeling closer to their dogs and feeling very proud of their accomplishments.  It is also a perfect first title for a owner. I encourage students to attempt to pass their Canine Good Citizen before working towards goals like public access for service animals, therapy work or even the BH (Which is the first level title in IPO). 

Learn more about Canine Good Citzen

Once our students complete the AKC Canine Good Citizen we don’t want to see their training stop so we encourage them to consider sports like Rally, Advanced Canine Good Citizens or my favorite AKC Tricks Titles. 

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You can train for Trick titles at home on your own or in our Drop in Trick classes that we offer in Englewood Colorado.  What I love about the Trick Titles is it is really geared towards HELPING your dog be successful.  Plus, once again ALL breeds can title!  

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We held our second ever AKC Tricks Title Event a few weeks ago.  We offered the AKC Canine Good Citizen and right after we offered the AKC Tricks Titles Testing.  It worked our perfectly and boy-o-boy did we have a turnout.

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Please enjoy these photos and if you would like to learn about our next Tricks class or event find us on FACEBOOK! 

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Muzzle Myths

muzzle myths

lab comfortable in a well fit muzzle

“Muzzles have done more to protect owners and their dogs than legislation”, quote by Dr Mugford.

A muzzle is not a bad thing… yes, that’s right lets say it again.  A muzzle is not a bad thing.  Many people feel a tinge of shame, fear or embarrassment when they are told their dog should be muzzle trained.  I would love to see the muzzle stigmas removed.  Here is my attempt to help dog owners understand muzzles just a little bit better.

 

Let’s start by busting some myths:

My dog can’t eat or drink with a muzzle on. 

There are different types of muzzles.  Some are ideal for vet clinics and others are perfect for training, because they allow your dog to drink, pant and eat through the muzzle.  The best muzzles for training reactive dogs are basket muzzles.

 

A muzzle will not fit my dog. 

Yes, it will.  Deerhounds, rotties, pugs, and great danes there is a muzzle that will comfortably fit every dog breed.  There is a muzzle on the market for every dog in every shape and size… heck there are even goat muzzles available.  There are even muzzles that can be purchased, heated up in the microwave and custom fit to your dogs face.  Make sure that you pick a muzzle that fits your dog and if your not sure how to do this click here fitting muzzles.

 

Muzzles will make my dog look scary looking. 

Maybe, this is true, but muzzles are frequently used by responsible owners in all sorts of situations – such as controlling excitable animal during vet visit, when meeting new dogs, or during busy events and gatherings – and new products have been designed to be welfare friendly. They are another great tool in the training box for responsible owners – alongside good discipline and positive reinforcement – and ultimately provide peace of mind if you are worried about a dog’s reaction.

 

My dog can’t protect himself in a muzzle.

Yes, that right they can’t.  That being said it is our responsibility to protect our dog.  If you are putting your dog in situations where he feels like he needs to protect himself or really actually needs to protect himself then that maybe a even bigger problem.  If your dog has a opportunity to bite a human or another animal that could be a really big problem.  Thousands of dogs a year are euthanized for behaving badly.  This allows you to protect your dog from his own behavior.

 

“I can handle my dog without a muzzle.”  and “I really don’t think he needs one” 

A dog biting a human or animal is a really big deal.  With tougher laws surrounding antisocial dog behavior coming into force, dog owners might find themselves worried what the changes could mean for them. The legal changes mean a possible 14-year prison sentence for owners of dogs that kill, as well as tougher terms for people whose animals attack a person in a home or private property, or attack assistance animals such as guide dogs.  Here’s the deal you don’t only wear a seat belt when you ride in a car because you anticipate getting into a car wreck, it is just incase.  If you wear it and don’t get into a wreck it’s no big deal, but if you get into a wreck and your not wearing one you may wish you had been.  The same is true for a muzzle, if there is any potential for your dog biting a human or animal it is your responsibility to fit your dog with a muzzle.  Don’t let ego cloud your judgment.

To learn how to teach your dog to love wearing a muzzle read this: Muzzle Training

 

Why Didn’t Obedience Classes Work?

The Right Tool for the Job

Pat Blocker, CPDT-KA, is a Certified Professional Dog Trainer with over 19 years experience. She offers private in-home training specializing in solving canine behavior issues. 

Trick dog training kids

kids can train too!

“I suppose it is tempting, if the only tool you have is a hammer, to treat everything as if it were a nail.” – Abraham Maslow

“What do you want to get from this class?” It happens in almost every obedience class orientation. Someone responds to that question with the likes of, “I want my dog to stop barking and lunging at other dogs.” “I want my dog to stop growling at children.” “I want my dog to stop barking all day while I’m at work.”

Owners are surprised to learn that the aforementioned are behavior issues, which cannot be effectively addressed with obedience training. In reality, there is obedience training and there is behavior modification. They are not the same. To use Maslow’s analogy, attempting to solve behavior issues with obedience training is treating the problem like a nail, because the only tool we think to be available is a hammer.

The widely held belief that obedience classes are an easy fix to all problems can ultimately result in owners believing that training doesn’t work. Take the problem of barking, for instance. The dog that is barking all day while home alone is not disobedient or unruly. Her barking might be due to separation anxiety, boredom, and/or lack of basic needs being met. It’s not a disobedient dog that is growling at children or barking and lunging at other dogs. The behavior could stem from, among other things, fear, which cannot be addressed with obedience training.

Behavior modification and obedience training have different objectives. Obedience training is for the disobedient and unruly dog. It sets boundaries and establishes rules. Behavior modification is intended to change the dog’s emotional state. It requires effective management and training that addresses the root cause of the problem. Manners can help with the management and control of many issues, but don’t change them on the emotional level. If we change the way a dog feels about something, we will change the way she behaves in its presence.

Behavior modification and obedience training are, however, intertwined. Obedience exercises can be taught to complement behavior modification. For instance, basic obedience training can help build the fearful dog’s confidence and leash-walking skills, like paying attention, can help the reactive dog. Basic obedience builds communication and both types of training help to establish a healthy relationship between owner and dog. (Communication and understanding canine body language are important elements in preventing problems and instrumental in the treatment of behavioral issues.)

Behavior modification addresses issues, which are often complex. It requires evaluation and treatment by a skilled trainer or behaviorist with knowledge of learning theory, animal behavior, and ethology. Some owners, believing that obedience training will solve behavioral issues may employ ineffective, even abusive punishment resulting in frustration (on both ends of the leash) without solving the problem.

Taking a dog in need of behavior modification to obedience class could make matters worse. For example, immersing the fearful dog into a roomful of other dogs, risks creating extreme fear and even damaging the owner-dog relationship.

Obedience training in lieu of behavior modification may not only exacerbate the problem, but can be unkind as well. In my opinion, it is cruel to ask the frightened dog to sit and look at me or to punish her in the presence of the thing that terrifies her. For example, training methods based on the theory of dominance, often use obedience as the solution. In theory, if the dog is afraid, make her obedient and submissive. Here, it appears that dominance has worked because the dog is not reacting. However, if anything, the dog is more afraid–afraid of the frightening situation and now of you. Pushed to her limits, she will revert to the old behavior. Punishment and dominance can serve to suppress the behavior, but like a beach ball held underwater, sooner or later, it will resurface.

Behavior modification takes you from reactive to proactive. Sure, I can correct a dog for lunging and barking at another dog. I can (maybe) get the dog to sit and look at me instead, but this won’t change future behavior.

Choosing the right training tool can be confusing because the same problem might require a different tool. For instance, your dog lunges and pulls on the leash whenever another dog passes. The problem could be solved either by obedience training or by behavior modification, depending on the emotion that lies beneath the behavior. Is the dog lunging at the passing dog because she is excited and wants to greet him, or is she doing it because she’s afraid and attempting to warn him off?

The friendly dog with no leash-walking skills wanting to greet the passing dog has, perhaps learned that lunging and pulling gets her what she wants. If she’s been allowed to pull her owner up to other dogs, she gets a payoff–greeting the dog. Here, we could use obedience training to teach polite meet and greets.

The fearful dog is lunging and barking at passing dogs in order to get space from them. She’s using a good offense as her best defense. A behavior modification plan to help her feel more comfortable in the presence of other dogs will address the root cause of the behavior. When the emotions behind the actions are dealt with, the lunging and barking will diminish naturally. Then, if we want to tweak leash-walking skills we’ll do some obedience training.

Knowing the difference between obedience training and behavior modification will help you choose the right tool for the job. Ensure that your training choice meets the criteria to resolve the issue by properly defining it, and then implement the plan. Now, you’ve nailed it.

 

Pat Blocker, CPDT-KA, is a Certified Professional Dog Trainer with over 19 years experience. She offers private in-home training specializing in solving canine behavior issues. Contact Pat at Peaceful Paws • 303-364-4681 • http://www.peacefulpaws.netpat@peacefulpaws.net. Pat the author of Taking the Lead with Jerking the Leash available on Amazon. www.peacefulpaws.net

 

Solutions For Motivating Yourself To Practice With Your Dog

English mastiff stay

Practicing a down stay while out on a walk

You say you didn’t have time to practice or you couldn’t get yourself motivated to practice training your dog.

We’ve all been here. No, really even I have been.  We’ve all had that week that we’re just too busy to practice training our dogs.

Legitimately, people will sometimes have a week when they’re just too busy to practice whether a family emergency occurred, it’s finals week, or you’re busy focused on moving.

What should I do if I’m too busy to practice training my dog?

  • Increase enrichment– your dog still needs the mental stimulation. When you’re in a time pinch one of the best solutions is going to be enrichment feeders. Click here for more enrichment ideas
  • Spend a little extra money and higher a day trainer– I prefer day training over a doggy daycare or dog walker.  Remember any time you’re interacting with your dog your dog you are either training them or un-training them. If a dog walker is allowing them to pull or doggie daycare is allowing them to run around barking then think about the behaviors your dog is practicing.

Are you truly too busy to train?

If you find yourself sitting down on the couch the end of the day you can probably sneak in a few eye contacts during a commercial break.   Let’s face it, most TV channels have too many commercials anyways.  It’s a great way to pass the time.   Short, little, commercial break length training sessions are ideal for practicing eye contacts sits, downs and stays. Did you just get sucked into TV land?  Do you find yourself watching video after video on YouTube?  What about scrolling mindlessly through Facebook? If that’s the case you definitely have time to train your dog for every time you open a new window or a new app try making yourself train for 5 minutes.

I was confused while practicing, so I didn’t really want to practice the wrong thing.

If you’re not positive what you’re supposed to be practicing, it can be discouraging.  No wonder you don’t want to practice.

Ask yourself the following questions:

  • Is there a part of the material that you did understand?  Chances are it will be incredibly helpful if you practice just the parts that you DID understand.
  • Did it all go over your head?   If that’s the case try calling or emailing your dog trainer through the week. Ask them to give you an overview and be sure to tell them you are confused on the material. They can often help identify what part you found confusing and clarify the training material, so you don’t miss out on the whole week. If you can’t get ahold of your dog trainer then you can find videos related to the topic on YouTube. Yes there’s YouTube for everything including dog training. If you were working on practicing “leave it” go on YouTube and see how they show you to practice it.  
  • When all else fails practice things that your dog already knows. While he may not be learning the new skills it will still help him learn to build his focus.The more he practices; even simple tasks, the better he will be at focusing on you.

My dog is being stubborn and I can’t get him to do it.    

If your dog is being stubborn there is a couple ways to work through this.

If your dog is acting like he wants to be stubborn try asking yourself the following:

  • At what step of practice did he begin acting stubborn?     If your dog was successful on the first step of practice, but not the next you may need to review the previous step further. Practice the previous step with your dog for several more sessions before trying to move on.
  • For example: If you are practicing stay and he can stay if you walk away four steps, but not five, then continuing practicing at four steps for a few more sessions.They have brain farts in can get confused just like you and I, so sometimes they just need a reminder by going back a few steps.
  • Is there any way that I could lower the level of distraction?   Sometimes lowering the level of distraction allows your dog to focus better.   If you’re practicing in the living room with kids running around and another dog right there consider taking training to the bedroom where it’s just you and your puppy.   Once your puppy can focus and preform the behavior you are working on correctly, then go back to the living room and try again.
  • Am I using the right motivation?     If your dog hates carrots, and you’re trying to use carrots to train your dog it may seem like your dog is being stubborn. Try to use different types of rewards like a favorite toy, hot dog, dice string cheese or anything that your dog seems to love. 

Need help picking a motivator? Check this blog out

Remember that when you invest just five minutes a day into training your dog you will begin to see results. You don’t have to carve out an hour of your day every day.  You can add it into everyday life by doing things like having your dog sit and stay before placing his food bowl down, asking him to stay on his bed while you brush your teeth, practice “leave it’s” while you cooking breakfast!

The more family members in the home that get involved in the dog’s training the more training he will be receiving.

Now stop reading and go practice!

 

Marker Words, Marking Correct Behaviors

Postive dog training
Why do we use reward markers? 
When you take a class with Bennett Canine Training you will be asked to select a reward marker during your first session with us. A reward marker is a very clear way of communicating with your dog which increases your dog’s understanding of the content we are teaching and decreases how long it takes your dog to learn new behaviors.

What is a reward marker? 
A reward marker or a bridge word is used to tell your dog the exact minute they performed the correct Behavior.   A great example of this is if you were teaching your dog to make eye contact with you. If you asked your dog to look in your eyes and then simply fed him a treat you would be treating him while he was looking at the treating your hand not your eyes.   The moment you move your hands your dog WILL instinctively look at your hands. Whereas if you were able to use a word to say “that’s correct, now your food is coming” you can Mark while your dog’s eyes are still on your eyes before they look to the treat. Another important example would be if your dog was at a park off leash and you ask your dog to leave something, you want to be able to pinpoint the exact minute they left the object, even if it’ll take five to 10 seconds for your dog to make it across the field to you. Timing on your rewards is critical.

Why don’t we just use good boy? 
Technically you can use good talk good or good boy, but often times this word is used very frequently by strangers meeting your dog or by family and friends when they’re interacting with your dog. We want our marker word to be a special word that is used only when we will produce a reward after it.  This word is only between Handler and dog. If we choose to use good boy and our dog jumps up on somebody and they say good boy then they’re reinforcing that incorrect Behavior.

When to use a marker word? 
Imagine that your marker word is a camera and you want to take a picture of the exact moment your dog does the correct Behavior. If I was working on teaching sit, I would use my marker word the second my dogs butt hit the floor or if I was working on down I would use my marker word the second my dog’s elbows hit the ground.

What word should I select for my marker word? 
It doesn’t really matter as long as you consistently use it before giving your dog the food reward. Timing is more important.  It should go, marker word pause food reward with only one to two seconds in between.   Marker words that I typically recommend for my students are yes, nice, super, yup or sweet.

Good luck in training and have fun!

pit bull postive training

Sparky turns his head after hearing his marker word

Teaching Dogs to Participate in Procedures

dog-wearing-e-collar-and-growling-istockphoto-11025574bd071716

What do you do when your groomer say’s she can’t groom your dog anymore because of behavior?  Does your dog get uncomfortable when it’s time to put a harness on?  Does your vet ask you to muzzle your dog before you bring him in? 

Your not alone.

 I was talking to a student, Nicole who had been putting off surgery for he dog for sometime, because her dog; Muffin, a 180 pound mastiff mix would growl when she tried to put the cone on the dog. 

Nicole believed that Muffin was being dominate and that the restraint was causing Muffin to “act out.”   

I asked if she could bring Muffin’s cone to the next class so I could see. 

When she pulled the cone out of bag Muffin shut her mouth and backed away she was very scared. 

 I asked Nicole if I could have the cone and Muffins leash.  I threw the cone in the opposite direction of Muffin and as she very slowly crept up to the scary cone I clicked her and gave her a treat. 

Dogs are forced to participate in things medical and grooming procedures that frighten them.  The more scared the dog the more force that is required.  This has to stop.  There is a better less stressful way.   This causes vets, techs and groomers extra work, extra risk and causes your dog extra stress.  Procedures like putting a cone on, getting a bath, getting eye drops or even nail trims can be trained and put on cue.  Teaching your dog to choose to participate in these activities makes it so your vet and groomer have a easier time handling your dog this allows them to do a better job more safely.  It also make the situation so much less stressful to your dog. 

 You can teach any dog to be comfortable in these situations if you use counter conditioning.  

What is Counter Conditioning? 

Well in technical speak Counterconditioning is the conditioning of an unwanted behavior or response to a stimulus into a wanted behavior or response by the association of positive actions with the stimulus. 

In other words your dog see’s a cone and growls; because he has negative emotions towards the cone if you change the emotion the behavior growling will resolve it’s self. 

 

How should I work on my dog’s fear? 

  1. Teach your dog to associate the object with something good so for example when Muffin was afraid of the cone I moved it away from her and when she checked it out I marked it with a reward marker and gave her a treat.   I repeated this until she figured out every time she looked at it she got a treat.  This could also work for a brush or nail clippers. 
  1. Reward interactions with touching the object.  When I was teaching Muffin to put her head in the cone I raised my criteria when she started to get excited when she saw the cone.  Now, muffin had to touch the cone with her nose to get marked for the correct behavior and treated. 
  1. The final product. Now Muffin no longer had a fear response to the cone which means that I was able to stick my hand through the cone and lure her head all the way through.  When her head was in the hole I marked and reward. I continued this until she offered to put her head in the cone without a treat being on the other side. 
  1. Naming the behavior.  Now that Muffin was choosing to put the cone on all by her self I decided to name this behavior cone.  I held the cone open and said “Cone” since she was already offering the behavior on her own, she put her head in the cone. 

 

Now that Muffin understands that it isn’t scary to put her head in the cone Nicole can stand with the cone in her hand and say “cone”.  Muffin comes running and puts her own head in the cone.  This is less stressful for Nicole as 180 pound Muffin looks a little scary when she growls, but it is less stressful for Muffin too. 

Are you still wondering how this can work for bath time and nail trims?   

Click below for step by step how to:

Train The Love Of Nail Trims

Love Bath Time

big saint bernard

 

Treats, Squirrels and More

You should never limit your motivational tool box to food rewards.

While we use a significant number of training treats in our classes we encourage all owners to think outside the box. You will have far more reliable behaviors if you learn to utilize the other rewards that already exist in your dog’s daily life.
First let’s consider what is a reward to your dog.
 Does your dog get excited when you pick up your keys to go for a car ride? Does your dog get excited when you walk towards the cabinet which holds his food? Does your dog go bananas when you pick up the leash?
If your dog is becoming excited for something consider this a reward. Your dog obviously finds it incredibly enjoyable and it’s a great opportunity to start to build some manners.
Make a list of all of the things your dog gets excited for whether it’s being invited onto the couch, being handed it’s favorite toy or just having a leash snapped on to his collar these are all opportunities for rewarding your dog utilizing something other than a food reward.
How to teach your dog to say please by sitting.
When you pick up the leash and your dog becomes very excited roll the leash up in your hand so none of it is dangling (if it’s dangling your dog may choose to bite at it) and wait. Your dog will probably offer the same behavior that’s worked for him for the last year or the last 6 months which may be spinning around in circles barking or even jumping on you.
I want you to ignore all that, so don’t try this exercise if you are in a hurry.  It may seem counterproductive but allowing your dog to cycle through those behaviors.  That will allow him to problem-solve and learn what behaviors do not work to get the leash put on.
Eventually your dog will offer a, behavior that is calmer.
If your dog was previously jumping on you and biting at the leash then you’re calmer Behavior might be standing and pausing for a second. If your dog was previously just spinning in circles without making any physical contact your, behavior might be a sit.
The moment you get the behavior that you’re happy with say “yes” and snap the leash to your dog’s collar. After a week of this your dog will automatically choose the behavior that gets him his reward having the leash placed on him the fastest.
You will be surprised by how little your dog now have to cycle through the other behaviors that formally earned him the reward of having a leash put on.
 Remember you get what you reward.
training bully dogs

We use all rewards, not just treats!

Faster Training With Markers

trick training

Markers are great for all dogs

Why we use reward markers…. 
When you take a class with Bennett Canine Training you will be asked to select a reward marker during your first session with us. A reward marker is a very clear way of communicating with your dog which increases your dog’s understanding of the content we are teaching and decreases how long it takes your dog to learn new behaviors.

What is a reward marker? 
A reward marker or a bridge word is used to tell your dog the exact minute they performed the correct Behavior.   A great example of this is if you were teaching your dog to make eye contact with you. If you asked your dog to look in your eyes and then simply fed him a treat you would be treating him while he was looking at the treating your hand not your eyes.   The moment you move your hands your dog WILL instinctively look at your hands. Whereas if you were able to use a word to say “that’s correct, now your food is coming” you can Mark while your dog’s eyes are still on your eyes before they look to the treat. Another important example would be if your dog was at a park off leash and you ask your dog to leave something, you want to be able to pinpoint the exact minute they left the object, even if it’ll take five to 10 seconds for your dog to make it across the field to you. Timing on your rewards is critical.

Why don’t we just use good boy? 
Technically you can use good talk good or good boy, but often times this word is used very frequently by strangers meeting your dog or by family and friends when they’re interacting with your dog. We want our marker word to be a special word that is used only when we will produce a reward after it.  This word is only between Handler and dog. If we choose to use good boy and our dog jumps up on somebody and they say good boy then they’re reinforcing that incorrect Behavior.
 
When to use a marker word? 

Imagine that your marker word is a camera and you want to take a picture of the exact moment your dog does the correct Behavior. If I was working on teaching sit, I would use my marker word the second my dogs butt hit the floor or if I was working on down I would use my marker word the second my dog’s elbows hit the ground.

What word should I select for my marker word? 
It doesn’t really matter as long as you consistently use it before giving your dog the food reward. Timing is more important.  It should go, marker word pause food reward with only one to two seconds in between.   Marker words that I typically recommend for my students are yes, nice, super, yup or sweet.

Good luck in training and have fun!

Take The Pulling Test

Do you want to know how good at loose leash walking your dog is?  The answer might surprise you.
When we are testing our dog’s leash manners were going to be asking our dog a series of questions. Our dog will answer the questions based on the way he responds to each exercise.
Choose the answer based on your dog’s response to the exercise

Walk your dog 10 steps and stop:
1. My dog was looking at me, so he knew I stopped.  He stopped to before taking the slack out of the leash
2. My dog didn’t know I stopped until he ran out of leash, but then he stopped and came back to me
3. My dog didn’t know I stopped until he ran out of leash and then he continued to pull

While walking your dog say his name several times:
1. As soon as I said my dog’s name he looked up at me and stayed focused on me for at least 5 Seconds afterwards.
2. When I said my dog’s name he continued to pull, but he did look back at me. The glance back was only for a second.
3.  My dog didn’t have a response to his name, maybe he’s deaf.

Walk 10 steps and then change directions repeat this two times:
1. My dog knew I was going to turn before I even turned, because he was already paying attention.
2. My dog wasn’t ready for the first turn, but was paying attention and ready for the second turn.
3. My dog wasn’t ready for either turn, he was already pulling and distracted by the time we were done turning.

Dogs that earned mostly ones:
Congratulations, you’ve got a job who is great on leash. This is the type of dog you can walk while holding a cup of coffee. Many dog owners dream of owning a dog like yours.

Dogs that are earned mostly twos:
Your dog has some great skills.   Your dog may occasionally pull hard for the most part you can enjoy walking your dog unless a big distraction pops up like a rabbit or squirrel. With just a little bit of training your dog will be an All-Star.

Dogs that earned mostly threes:
Your dog is a bit of a party animal. He’s looking for fun and he’s highly distracted. Consider getting in front clip no pull harness to use for the first few weeks of training. You may want to start practicing your loose leash walking in the house or in the backyard for a few days before you take it outdoors.

Follow our loose leash walking tips Wednesday on our Facebook page. Exercise each week. If you follow along your dogs will have great loose leash walking skills in no time.

blue mastiff

See the loose leash?

Teaching Puppies To Let Go Of Objects

puppy Classroom
“Help!!!  My puppy is chewing on the piddle pads. He picks them up and runs
around the house like he is declaring catch me if you can. I know I
shouldn’t chase my puppy, but what should I do? Help it is making my
wife crazy!”

Your puppy isn’t the first puppy to discover this really fun way to
activate a vigorous game of chase with his owners. Everyone is
sitting in the living room playing on their phone or watching TV, the
puppy goes and picks up the piddle pad (or sock) and all of a sudden
every one’s full attention is on puppy. Oh and what a fun game of
catch me if you can is.

Let’s start by focusing by seeing this from your puppy’s point of view
and imagine for a moment I asked you if I could take a look at the
twenty in your wallet. Let’s pretend you hand it to me and I slipped
it into my pocket and walked away.  Would you show me your fifty?

We have to acknowledge that even though it is just a pee pad to us it
is a prized toy of the puppy’s. This can actually create much bigger
problems in the future. Fear of having prized objects stolen is what
creates resource guarding which is a dangerous behavior problem for a
adult dog.

Turn the tables on the chase game
Maybe don’t start this with a pee pad, but instead have play this game
with several dog toys. Toss a ball, tug or dog toy 2-3 feet away from
your feet and as soon as your puppy picks it up in their mouth run
away from your puppy while showing your puppy another toy in you
hands. Say “bring” when your puppy starts heading away. Keep your
sessions short and use different toys each session. Remember to run
away from your puppy not towards your puppy. Once your puppy is in
the great habits of running towards you with objects he picks up try
using this when your puppy has objects he shouldn’t.

Teaching your puppy to share prizes and teaching drop on request
Sharing a prized pinecone that your puppy found while out on his walk
may not be at the top of his to do list, but we can teach your puppy
that sharing prizes is actually a big win for him. If he thinks
sharing is a good idea than that’s a win for you too.
For this you will need to have 5-7 object your dog likes to pick up
like a paper towel, pine cone, stick, feather duster, slipper, ect.
You will also need high value crumbly treats like crumbled cheese or
blue buffalo dog treat rolls.
In a empty room with nothing on the floor walk around and say “drop”
1- 2 seconds after saying “drop” place 3-4 crumbled treats on the
floor. Repeat this 15 times.
Then put one of your decoy objects on the ground and completely ignore
your puppy and object. Walk around and say drop then place the treats
on the ground even if your puppy still has the decoy object in his/her
mouth. Repeat this 10 times with each decoy object. Remember don’t
try to pick up the object just leave it on the ground. It’s okay if
your puppy goes back and picks up the object.
Once your dog gets comfortable leaving the decoy object for the
dropped treats then you can say “drop” and only drop the treats once
your puppy spits out the object. Don’t try to steal the prized
possession from your puppy right away unless it is something
dangerous. Instead do three to five drops each time your puppy picks
up something he shouldn’t.

Putting it all together
Now your puppy knows “bring” and “drop” so if you see your puppy pick
something up that he should have ask your puppy to bring and then ask
for a drop. Be sure to reward your puppy well the better the prize he
has the better your should reward your puppy.
Good luck with training puppies can be a lot of work just remember
train smarter not harder. If your puppy thinks it’s a good idea he is
sure to do the behavior you want.
Teaching drop